Photography

I’ve been forced into taking photos as a part of my studies at CUNY. I built this slideshow for class. It’s an experiment and student work at best.  ...

read more

Comic Con Photos

I did not make it to New York Comic Con this year. However, I was in New York for a workshop at CUNY. As a result I shared a train with a lot of people whom were going to the convention. I saw even more at Penn Station. However, since I was in a hurry, I only got a two photos. I really regret this because there were so many people in costume. At my train station, there were only a few people in costume. Once I arrived at Penn Station, I lost track of the number of people I saw in costume. It got even worse as I approached CUNY. There were not only people in costume, but many wearing convention badges. As much as I enjoy learning about new journalism tools, in my off time I like Marvel films, anime and many things geeky. So I was torn between my desire to be at New York Comic Con and learning about a new program. Long story short, so while I was very happy to learn Final Cut Pro X, there was a tiny piece of my brain that was chanting “Next year I am going to New York Comic...

read more

My first New York clip

Today, my first New York clip was published. It was in the Downtown Express, a paper that covers Lower Manhattan. ‘Jenga’ building doesn’t fly with local residents The notion of a new high-rise residential building in Tribeca is not sitting well among neighborhood residents. Nicknamed “Jenga” after the popular puzzle game for its unusual design, the Leonard Street development is poised to become the highest building in Tribeca, standing 800 feet tall at more than 57 stories. Unlike most buildings in the area, the Jenga building is designed as a post-modern structure with a glass-and-steel facade. But despite the lack of enthusiasm about the building, construction of the city-approved project at 56 Leonard St. has already begun. Members of Community Board 1’s Tribeca Committee, which saw renderings of the development at its Oct. 10 meeting, reacted negatively to the idea of having such a tall building among the area’s numerous low-rise structures. Committee member Noel Jefferson asserted that the building does not belong in the neighborhood. “We need to make people understand we’re not 57th Street, we’re Tribeca,” she said. The building’s location at 56 Leonard St. is adjacent to New York Law School, which previously owned the land. A corporation set up for the property called 56 Leonard L.L.C. now owns the building. Real estate company Alexico Group lists the Tribeca property as a new development. Records from the City Register Office’s database show that the Alexico Group received extra financing from the New York branch of Hypothekenbank Frankfurt AG, a German real estate bank. C.B. 1 documents show that the property is sandwiched between the Tribeca East and Tribeca West historic districts. Since the lot sits just outside of Tribeca’s historic districts, its zoning allows for a high-rise building. Lynn Ellsworth — founder of the Tribeca Trust, a new, local organization that seeks to preserve the neighborhood’s historic and architectural character — is equally displeased with the proposed high-rise development. Despite the fact that 56 Leonard St. is outside of the historic...

read more

Rider News Articles

While I was an undergrad at Rider University, I wrote for the university publication The Rider News. It is entirely student-run under supervision from a journalism professor and a Rider alum who worked for Gannet. Here I’ve re-posted one of my favorite pieces. The Background:  My sophomore year at Rider, the school hosted a horror film symposium. This is article was a preview of the event. Film symposium to explore the heart of horror Fake blood, zombies and a vampire slayer named Buffy — oh my. Rider will dedicate its second annual film symposium, titled “A Mini Course in Horror,” to the genre. The four-day event will feature screenings of popular shows such as The Twilight Zone, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and the Simpsons; classic films such as The Wolf Man, Night of the Living Dead and The Texas Chainsaw Massacre; panels about the various aspects of horror; and a student film competition. “It’s one of the most diverse genres in film, with countless sub-genres, and no true definition of what makes a horror film,” said Zach Bowen, a senior English major with a concentration in cinema studies. “Everyone has their own opinions of how they like their horror and how they would characterize the genre.” The events show exactly how broad the horror genre can be, as their subject matter ranges from popular television programs to obscure foreign films. House, a Japanese cult film that was just released in the United States, will make its New Jersey premiere at the Horror Film Symposium (see Review, p. 7). “What makes horror so unique is that it can act as the perfect metaphor,” Bowen said. “Stories are meant to have purpose and meaning behind them.” (see more...

read more

My First News Photo

While out on a reporting exercise during my orientation at CUNY, my partner and I came across some construction. I took some photos with my old cell phone, which had a camera on it. The result was better than I thought it would be originally. I unknowingly followed a lot of photography rules because I knew them from publication design courses. I placed near the construction vehicle in the optical center. The rule of thirds, also known as the golden ratio, is followed too. The lesson here is that some skills overlap. Something I learned for one purpose helped me with another application. It’s one of the things that makes multimedia journalism so fun, little discoveries like this. It’s almost as good as when I discovered my knowledge of iMovie made learning Final Cut Pro X much easier....

read more